Astronomers Have Identified A Bridge Of Bright Blue Stars And It Is About To Explode

This is a completely new area of the Milky Way. Astronomers have discovered a new Milky Way. It is filled with intensely hot, bright-blue stars that can explode.

Astronomers Have Identified A Bridge Of Bright Blue Stars And It Is About To Explode

This is a completely new area of the Milky Way.

Astronomers have discovered a new Milky Way. It is filled with intensely hot, bright-blue stars that can explode.

Researchers at the European Space Agency (ESA) are using the Gaia telescope. The star sign of the galaxy was making a detailed map of the spiral arm when they discovered the region, named Cepheus spur, according to a new research report.

Orion Arm, This is where we have our solar system. And the constellation Perseus. The spur is like a belt between two spiral arms, it contains many huge stars 3 times the mass of the sun, and their light looks blue.

Astronomers call these giant, blue stars OB stars because they are one of the warmest in the constellation. These types of stars are the rarest, warmest, shortest-lived, and largest stars in the entire galaxy. The nuclear reaction at their center makes them six times hotter than the sun. And the massive stellar explosions that end their lifespan - called supernovae - scatter the heavy elements necessary for a mixed lifespan into the galaxy.

Michelangelo Pantaleoni González, a researcher and co-author of the study at the Spanish Astrobiology Center (CAB), told LiveScience: "OB stars are rare, in a galaxy of 400 billion stars there could be less than 200,000." "And since they are responsible for creating so many heavier elements, they can actually be seen as galaxy chemical enrichers. Because of such stars, the geochemistry of our planet was complex enough for evolution." According to researchers, wherever we find blue stars, we find the most active and most "vibrant" regions of the galaxy.

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The researchers compiled a map of their stars by triangulating the distances of the stars to Earth using a technique called stellar parallax. Astronomers themselves can calculate the distances of stars by comparing the apparent positions of stars observed from different angles during Earth's orbit around the Sun. Using this technique, with data from ESA's Gaia telescope, the team mapped stars at distances before space and beyond anyone area that was previously considered empty.

"We got to see this wonderful map for the first time in a few months," said Pantaleoni González. "We were very proud to be able to find the first accurate map of the world - this was another milestone. Seeing the vastness of our stellar region made us feel very small."

Scientists have proven that the new region is a part of a spiral galaxy consisting of most of the elements in our galaxy and that it is not just a random classification of stars, they move continuously in the same direction that can be observed.

They also think that looking at the location of the spar above the galaxy's disk may provide some information about the Milky Way past.

"If we live in a galaxy with corrugation, which is somewhat vertical and ripples on the disk, it could point to a history of violent evolution for our galaxy," said Pantaleoni González. "These could be the result of collisions with other galaxies in the past.

The next step for researchers would be to place additional OB stars on a more precise map, which would provide more insight into the structure of our galaxy. The next step for researchers would be to place additional OB stars on a more precise map, which would provide more insight into the structure of our galaxy.

The researchers published their findings in the March 19 issue of the Royal Astronomical Society.